Links I Love (2.8.19)

Links I Love (2.8.19)

A friend recently introduced me to new members of our Bible Study group as a “Consumer of Information.” This descriptor fits me so well, I joked that I need to add it to my business card . . . when I get one made, that is. I find so much joy and fulfillment in the act of consuming information in all forms, whether podcasts or books or blogs. And I love the chance to share some of my findings here with you!

This batch of links contains a few insightful essays, some good life advice, and one extremely helpful kitchen tutorial. Enjoy!

On the Experience of Entering a Bookstore in Your Forties (vs. Your Twenties), by Steve Edwards

“Choosing is always a sweet sorrow. I don’t mean to lament that fact only to point out that, as with rivers, you never step into the same bookstore twice. And while I remain dazzled by the promise and possibility bookstores offer, I’ve found myself becoming somewhat apprehensive of them. Who needs the reminder of all you never were? Or of all you were but won’t ever be again? At 44 I feel a pressure that wasn’t there in my twenties.”


The Lazy Genius Guide to Food Prep, by Kendra Adachi

“The biggest point of food prepping is having food that’s so close to a meal that it can be grabbed or dunked in sauce or reheated and be awesome. Basically right away. Immediate awesomeness. Raw potatoes in water are helpful but not immediately awesome.”


All the Best Tips From Marie Kondo’s Netflix Show, by Raven Ishak

“One of the clear takeaways of the KonMari Method is that everything she does and says involves gratitude. You thank your items for their service before you toss them and you thank your home before you clean it up. At the beginning of every episode, Kondo takes a few moments to sit down on the ground of a home to greet it. In this moment, she thanks the house for its service and imagines what the future of the home will feel and look like.”


Psychology’s Five Revelations For Finding Your True Calling, by Christian Jarrett

“The researchers found that people who believe that passion comes from pleasurable work were less likely to feel that they had found their passion (and were more likely to want to leave their job) as compared with people who believe that passion comes from doing what you feel matters. Perhaps this is because there is a superficiality and ephemerality to working for sheer pleasure – what fits the bill one month or year might not do so for long – whereas working towards what you care about is a timeless endeavour that is likely to stretch and sustain you indefinitely.”


9 “Bad Habits” I Think You Should Adopt for a Happy Life, by Krista O’Reilly-Davi-Digui

“Other people’s opinions shouldn’t dictate how you should spend your time/strengths/money. You can break away from traditions, familiar patterns, or old habits that no longer serve you. This is hard work but hey, you’re the boss. You’ll reap amazing rewards when you show up and practice. We can invite wise people to speak into our lives and stay humble as we glean and learn – but ultimately I know I’m the expert on my life, body, and business and will not abdicate my power or responsibility.”


To All the Moms I’ve Ignored Before, by Meaghan O’Connell

“We can see that you want nothing to do with us. You haven’t made the mistakes we did yet. You haven’t fallen for any of the traps. You are forward-looking. You are wheel-reinventing. You have read all of our tweets and photo captions and essays and books (guilty) and you have metabolized the information, and you are going to actually make something of it. Fine, we say. Sure. We try to give you more advice and then we know we’ve come on too strong so we go back to our corners and watch the process unfold.”


Have you read or written anything particularly share-worthy lately? Drop a link in the comments!